Cucumber Varieties and
Types of Cucumbers

Cucumber varieties come in slicing, pickling, and "burpless" types. There are also "specialty" heirloom and greenhouse varieties of cucumbers.

Cucumber Varieties—'Chelsea Prize'
Cucumber Varieties—'Chelsea
Prize'
© Steve Masley
Click IMAGE to Enlarge

Slicing Cucumbers are the long, straight cucumbers commonly seen in supermarkets. They’re bred for fresh eating, with thin, non-bitter skins and slow development of seeds. "Burpless" cucumbers are slicing cucumbers bred to produce less of the bitter chemical that releases gas in the stomach.

Pickling Cucumbers are shorter, stouter, and have more spines, as well as drier flesh that allows them to soak up more of the brine they’re pickled in.

Specialty Cucumbers include heirloom cucumber varieties like ‘Lemon’ cucumbers and 'Sweet Armenian' cucumbers, as well as greenhouse cucumbers that require no pollination to set fruit.

Container Cucumbers are bred for compact vines, and are better for deck plantings and small space gardens.

In looking at cucumber varieties, you’ll see terms like "parthenocarpic" and "gynecoecous". Parthenocarpic cucumbers require no pollination, and are best for growing cucumbers in greenhouses, at lower temperatures, or where pollinator populations are low. Gynecoecous cucumbers produce mostly female (fruiting) flowers, to increase yields.





Slicing  |   Pickling  |   Specialty  |   Cucumber Varieties for Containers
Growing Cucumbers




Links to buy seeds below go to Cook's Garden Seeds, our seed supplier. Several photos are also from Cook's, since I don't have good photos of these varieties. Links go to organic seeds, whenever they're available, but not all varieties are available as organic seeds. Don't let lack of organic seeds keep you from trying new varieties. As long as you're growing your cucumbers organically, there will be no measureable chemical residues in plants you grow.


Slicing Cucumbers

Slicing cucumbers are bred for thin, non-bitter skins that don’t need to be peeled, and late seed formation. Harvest at the size recommended for the variety. If allowed to grow too large, seeds develop, the skins thicken, and the cucumbers and may become bitter.

'Burpless' cucumber are bred to reduce the bitter chemical that may cause stomach upset in some people. 'Oriental' varieties are the long, slender cucumbers found in Asian markets.

Cucumber Varieties—'Bush Slicer'
Cucumber Varieties—'Bush
Slicer'
© Steve Masley
Click IMAGE to Enlarge

‘Chelsea Prize’ (F1 hybrid, scab resistant) is a classic English slicing cucumber. Thin-skinned, non-bitter, "burpless", and sweet, with very few seeds, harvest these beauties at 12-15" (30-38cm). Parthenocarpic (self-pollinating) plants, suitable for outdoor or greenhouse production.

‘Bush Slicer’ (F1 Hybrid, Resistant to powdery mildew, cucumber mosaic virus, and scab). Produces crisp, sweet 6-8" (15-20cm) cucumbers with thin skins and small seed cavities. Compact vines are excellent for growing cucumbers in containers.

‘Diva’ (58 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to downey mildew powdery mildew, and scab, 2002 AAS All-American winner) produces thin-skinned, non-bitter, sweet, crisp, dark-green cucumbers that are seedless if harvested at optimal size, 7-8" (18-20 cm). All-female, self-pollinating flowers suitable for outdoor or greenhouse growth.

Cucumber Varieties—'Green Sweet Hybrid Burpless'
'Green Sweet Hybrid
Burpless' Cucumbers

Photo from Cook's Garden

Buy 'Green Sweet Hybrid
Burpless' Seeds
icon

‘Green Sweet Hybrid Burpless’ is one of the sweetest slicing cucumbers, and it's also "burpless". Medium green, harvest at 10-12" (25-30cm).

Buy 'Green Sweet Hybrid Burpless' Seeds icon

‘Sultan’ (56 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to powdery mildew and pepper, zucchini, and watermelon mosaic viruses) has high-yielding, vigorous vines that produce dark green, thin-skinned, delicious cucumbers. Requires pollinators for fruit set—outdoor production only.

‘Babylon’ (63 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to cucumber mosaic virus, powdery mildew, and downy mildew) is a consistently great performer across a wide range of soil types and temperatures. Produces abundant 7-8" (18-20cm) dark green, ribbed, sweet fruit.

'Marketmore 76' Cucumbers icon
'Marketmore 76' Cucumbers
Photo from Cook's Garden
Buy 'Marketmore 76' Seeds icon

‘Marketmore 76’ (58 days, heirloom open pollinated, resistant to cucumber mosaic virus, powdery mildew, downy mildew, and scab) is a reliable producer of straight, 8-9" (20-23cm) dark green fruits, across a wide variety of weather conditions.

Buy 'Marketmore 76' Seeds icon

‘Corinto (48 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to cucumber mosaic virus, angular leaf blight, downy mildew, powdery mildew and scab) starts early, and produces uniform 7-8" (18-20cm) fruits with small seed cavities. Produces well across a wide temperature range. Self-pollinating, all-female flowers.

‘Olympian’ (52 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to cucumber mosaic virus, powdery mildew, and downy mildew) is a very productive slicer that produces dark green, 8-9" (20-23cm) fruit.

‘Raider’ (52 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to cucumber mosaic virus, angular leaf spot, and scab) is an early, prolific producer of dark green, glossy, thin-skinned, crisp cucumbers. Early, robust, and disease resistant.

icon icon
'Orient Express' Cucumbers
Photo from Cook's Garden
Buy 'Orient Express' Seeds icon

‘Orient Express’ (64 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to downy mildew, powdery mildew, and cucumber mosaic virus) is a long, slender oriental slicer that grows up to 2 feet long (60cm)! Best harvested at 12-16" (30-40cm), but doesn't get bitter and retains excellent eating quality even when large.

Buy 'Orient Express' Seeds icon

‘Fountain’ (65 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to downy mildew, powdery mildew, and cucumber mosaic virus) is a vigorous producer of crisp, thin-skinned, burpless 8" (20cm) cucumbers. Produces well even in very hot weather.

‘Rocky’ (46 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to powdery mildew, parthenocarpic—produces fruit without need for pollination) is among the best cucumbers for harvesting small, "baby" cucs at 2-3" (5-8cm).

Slicing  |   Pickling  |   Specialty  |   Containers
Growing Cucumbers





Pickling Cucumber Varieties

'Sumter' Pickling Cucumber
'Sumter' Pickling Cucumbers
Photo from Cook's Garden
Buy 'Sumter' Seeds icon

Pickling cucumbers are shorter and stouter than slicing cucumbers, with drier flesh that soaks up more of the brine they’re pickled in.

‘Sumter' is a classic pickling cucumber, light green, squat, with a few white spines. Plants are resistant to cucumber mosaic virus and powdery mildew.

Buy 'Sumter' Seeds icon

‘Northern Pickling’ (55 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to scab and tolerant of cucumber mosaic virus), is a high-yielding producer of medium green, straight-sided pickling cucumbers.

‘Vectina’ (49 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to powdery mildew, scab, and cucumber mosaic virus) is a high-yielding, dark green pickling cucumber.

‘Alibi’ 49 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to cucumber mosaic virus, downy mildew, and powdery mildew) produces large yields of uniform, green cucumbers with white spines, on short vines.

'Homemade Pickles' Pickling Cucumber
'Homemade Pickles' Cukes
Photo from Cook's Garden
'Homemade Pickles' Seeds icon

‘Homemade Pickles’ (55 days, F1 Hybrid) is an excellent pickling cucumber bred for uniform size and shape. Vigorous, disease-resistant plants produce over a long season. Harvest at 1 1/2" (4cm) for baby sweet pickles, or at 5-6" (13-15cm) for spears or dill pickles.

Buy 'Homemade Pickles' Seeds icon

‘Diamant’ (47 days, F1 hybrid, resistant to cucumber mosaic virus, downy mildew, powdery mildew, and scab) is early, disease-resistant, and produces abundant yields of sweet cucumbers that can be eaten fresh or pickled. Parthenocarpic plants produce fruit without need for pollination.

‘Wautoma’ (60 days, heirloom open-pollinated, resistant to anthracnose, angular leaf blight, cucumber mosaic virus, downy mildew, powdery mildew, and scab) produces 4-5" (10-13cm) cucumbers on vigorous, 4-5’ (1-1.5m) vines. Great disease resistance, non-bitter and burpless, with excellent brining qualities.

‘Salt and Pepper’ (49 days, open-pollinated, resistant to angular leaf blight and powdery mildew) is a white-skinned pickler with black spines.

Slicing  |   Pickling  |   Specialty  |   Containers
Growing Cucumbers





Specialty and Heirloom
Cucumbers

Cucumber Varieties—'Sweet Armenian'
'Sweet Armenian' Cucumbers
© Steve Masley
Click IMAGE to Enlarge

Specialty cucumbers are heirloom cucumber varieties or greenhouse varieties. Heirloom cucumbers tend to produce later and have less developed disease resistance than modern hybrids, but are still widely grown for flavor, color, or other desirable characteristics.

Greenhouse cucumber varieties are self-fertile, and don’t require pollinators to produce fruit.

‘Sweet Armenian’ Cucumbers (60 days, heirloom open-pollinated) are long, ribbed cucumbers, often found in middle eastern markets, where they may be called "snake melons". Pale green or white and with pronounced ribs, they can be as large as 2’ (1/2 meter) long, and 3" (7.6 cm) wide, but they’re best harvested smaller, at 12" (30 cm) long and 1.5" (3.8 cm) wide.

'Lemon' Cucumbers
'Lemon' Cucumbers © Steve Masley
Click IMAGE to Enlarge

Sweet Armenian cucumbers have a mild cucumber flavor, like a melon without the sweetness. They need no peeling, and their ribbed shape makes interesting cross-sections when sliced.

‘Lemon Cucumbers’ (65 days, heirloom, open pollinated) are small, round, yellow cucumbers you often find in farmers markets. Harvest at 1 ½-2" (3.8-5 cm) for best flavor.

'Crystal Apple' Heirloom Cucumber
'Crystal Apple' Heirloom Cucumbers
Photo from Cook's Garden
Buy 'Crystal Apple Seeds icon

Lemon cucumbers are great for slicing into salads or onto sandwiches, but also make delicious pickles.

Buy 'Lemon' Cucumber Seeds icon

'Crystal Apple' (75 days, New Zealand heirloom) is a variety I'm trying for the first time this year.

‘Boothby’s Blonde’ (60-65 days, heirloom open-pollinated) produces high yields of 3-5" (7-13cm), light yellow fruits with black spines. Great for fresh eating or pickling.


Slicing  |   Pickling  |   Specialty  |   Containers
Growing Cucumbers


Cucumbers for Containers

Cucumber Varieties—'Bush Slicer'
Cucumber Varieties—'Bush
Slicer'
© Steve Masley
Click IMAGE to Enlarge

Although most varieties of cucumbers grow well in containers (as long as they’re at least 5-gallon size!), bush cucumber varieties are bred for compact vines, and are less rangy on decks and in small space gardens.

‘Bush Slicer’ (F1 hybrid, resistant to powdery mildew, cucumber mosaic virus, and scab). Produces crisp, sweet 6-8" (15-20cm) cucumbers with thin skins and small seed cavities. Compact vines are excellent for growing cucumbers in containers.

‘Green Fingers’ (F1 hybrid, powdery mildew tolerant). Excellent "Persian" style cucumber, like those found in middle eastern markets, has vigorous, self-pollinating vines that start producing early and produce well under challenging conditions (low or high temperatures). Harvest ‘Green Fingers’ at 3-5" (7-13cm).

Slicing  |   Pickling  |   Specialty  |   Containers
Growing Cucumbers


New! Comments

Have a question or comment about what you just read? Leave me a comment in the box below.

Subscribe to my e-zine
to learn about additions to the site.

E-mail Address 

Your First Name

Then

Your e-mail address is totally secure.
I promise to use it only to send you
The GiO Newsline.

    To Follow Grow-it-Organically.com:

       Grow-It-Organically.com on Facebook   Become a fan on facebook

       Follow me on Twitter   Follow me on Twitter

       Subscribe to the Grow It Organically Blog in a Reader   Subscribe in a reader

Follow Me on Pinterest

Activity on Google

   




Copyright © 2009-2014, by Steve Masley, Grow-it-Organically.com
All rights reserved

Protected by Copyscape Web Copyright Protection Software



HOME  |  About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy


Like Grow-it-Organically?





Follow Me on Pinterest

houzz interior design ideas


Comments from other Visitors


Thanks for all the great info! I have been gardening over 30 yrs and still learned things from your site!

--   Verlee Deana Norris Jenkins, Clinton, Arkansas

Awesome site, very informative, well laid out, very user friendly!--   Dorothy Carothers

I just love this site! I am on it just about everyday - just reading all the information you have posted. Thank you so much for your creative ideas, plant information and the beautiful pictures. This is My site for all my gardening questions. I have already started tomatoes, peppers and floral seeds under lights. Thanks again, Judy--   Judy Gianetto, Wolcott, Connecticut

Great info and very useful. I'm starting a new garden this spring and you've given me a lot of tips. Thanks and keep it up. Angie--   Gardener Angie

This looks like a fantastic website, full of useful information on growing organically. I'll be returning to it regularly!--   Vera Lynne, Sydney, Australia

I am recommending your website to my Master Gardener students. It is very informative and contains good info on growing organically.--   John Haase, Oklahoma State University

Awesome site! Really going to help me in my container gardening adventures this summer!--   Michelle Doherty

I found your site while looking for changing the pH info for an article I am writing. Now I will be linking to you on my blog as well, and visiting here often!--   Pam Carter

Greetings from 'Down under' in Victoria, Australia. Great gardening site with lots of info. Have put you on the favourite list for all the things I keep forgetting. Beautiful photos of your tomatoes etc. Kind regards and happy gardening.--   Liam, Victoria, Australia

I love your site! And, I'm lovin' my garden more because of it. Thank you for doing so, and helping folks like me get more out of my garden.--   Will Johnson, Denver, Colorado

I seriously learned how much healthier all my gardens could get just by reading your treatises on soil, pH, and bacterial/fungal symbiosis. Totally changed my world. I barely need to use anything to control pests now, where my gardens needed NEEM almost constantly before your site educated me.--   Khonsu Lunaris

Popular Pages


Starting Seeds for 2008 Garden 1
Starting a Vegetable
Garden

Tomato Varieties—‘Sweet Cluster’
Growing Tomatoes

Growing Eggplant ‘Farmer’s Long Purple’ in a Terra Cotta Pot
Growing Vegetables
in Containers

Growing Lettuce—SaladScape of Skyphos and Santoro Lettuce
Growing Lettuce

Growing Basil—‘Genovese’
Growing Basil

Pepper Varieties 'Gourmet', Hand for Scale
Growing Peppers

Growing Hot Peppers—'Bulgarian Carrot' 1
Growing Hot Peppers

Growing Spinach—‘Nobel’
Growing Spinach

Growing Cilantro in a Salad Table Tray

Like Grow-it-Organically?


Growing Cilantro

Winter Squash Varieties—‘Bonbon’ Buttercup
Growing Squash

‘Globe’ Artichoke from Page’s Garden
Growing Artichokes

Growing Broccoli 2
Growing Broccoli

‘Jade’ Green Beans Growing in a Window Box
Growing Green Beans

Growing Carrots—‘Babette’
Growing Carrots

Growing Cabbage
Growing Cabbage

Container Cucumber 'Bush Slicer' 2
Growing Cucumbers

Growing Lettuce in a Salad Table
Salad Tables



More Popular Pages


Finished Compost Pile
How to Compost

Alfalfa Meal NPK
Organic NPK Fertilizer

Soil—Wonderful Stuff, but Not Exactly Photogenic
Facts About Soil

Syrphid Fly on Flowering Cilantro (Coriander)
Natural Garden
Pest Control


Art Prints

Order Prints for Your Kitchen,
Office, or Dining Room